this week's big vinyl releases


You’ll want these records in your collection…

In this fast-paced musical landscape, where it’s so easy to simply put a playlist on shuffle, nothing compares to putting a record on, sitting back and enjoying all it has to offer in full (or at least until you have get up again to flip it over).

Every week, NME will round up the best vinyl releases available to buy or pre-order. Check out the best from this week below.

Foals – ‘Everything Not Saved Will Be Lost: Part 2’

NME say:

Back in March, we called ‘Everything Not Saved Will Be Lost: Part 1’ “a record that showcases every angle of Foals’ magic,” with frontman Yannis Philippakis teasing that ‘Part 2’ will be “heavier listen”. He tells us: “The guitars are more emphasised and there’s some big riffs on it. It’s a rock record and it definitely carries on the narrative from ‘Part 1’. ‘Part 1’ ended with a lot of fire and destructive imagery, ‘Part 2’ is trying to respond to that: how you can continue in the wreckage and through the scorched earth? We’re just excited for people to hear it because it completes the journey of what we’ve made over the last year-and-a-half.” You better believe that we’re excited too.

Norman Records say:

The days when Foals made post-punk that had them briefly touted as a math-rock band are long gone. As anyone who’s checked in with the group’s last few records can attest, Yannis et al now deal in a brand of meaty stadium-rock. ‘Everything Not Saved Will Be Lost: Part 2’, the companion piece to the ‘Part 1’ that was released earlier this year, continues to lean into this sound.

Lana Del Rey – ‘Norman Fucking Rockwell!’

NME say:

What can we expect from Lana Del Rey’s new album, the brilliantly-titled ‘Norman Fucking Rockwell!’? Well, as Lana herself recently said: “It’s in the vein of a Laurel Canyon sound, and it’s kind of transformed a little bit because there’s some surf elements… not really surfy like Dick Dale but a lot of electric guitar, a little Red Hot Chili Peppers influence in there.” It also features a cover of Sublime’s ‘Doin’ Time’, no less.

Norman Records say:

Lana Del Rey returns with her sixth album, [which] contains 14 new songs, most co-written with fun.’s Jack Antonoff. She’s pictured on the cover cavorting with none other than the grandson of Jack Nicholson. Buy your copy from Norman Fucking Records.

Marika Hackman – ‘Any Human Friend’

NME say:

Marika Hackman’s follow-up to 2017’s ‘I’m Not Your Man’, ‘Any Human Friend’ is all about self-discovery. As Marika herself explains: “This whole record is me diving into myself and peeling back the skin further and further, exposing myself in quite a big way. It can be quite sexual. It’s blunt, but not offensive. It’s mischievous. We all have this lightness and darkness in us… [But] after all is said and done, what it’s saying is, ‘you’re alright, it’s going to be fine’. The album is very much about us all accepting each other’s differences, the idea that we all want to be made of stone and be the same but in fact we’re golden.” Hear, hear. The record is out now on pink marbled vinyl.

Norman Records say:

Marika Hackman’s new album looks to combine the synthesizer stylings of OMD with the aggression of PJ Harvey, as well as dealing with big lyrical subjects such as sexuality, the patriarchy, and social excess. New single ‘i’m not where you are’ is a banger and the rest of the album should be as well.

Feeder – ‘Tallulah’

NME say:

Welsh rockers Feeder return with their 10th record and, according to the band themselves, it’s a “classic Feeder record”. Frontman Grant Nicholas says: “I just write the songs which feel natural to me, and I have a vision of each of them in my mind like a short film. I wanted to make a lot of the songs really adaptable. I didn’t want them to have be massively produced, I wanted them to also work in a stripped-back way.” ‘Tallulah’ also includes a song that was originally penned from none other than Liam Gallagher, too.

Norman Records say:

Feeder are back! In their first new material since 2017s critically appraised ‘Best Of’ they return to cover the Go Betweens 1987 album it’s entirety. Maybe not. Instead we get more of their punk-edged escapades where they blend American and British influences as if there was no water at all between the two places.

The Wedding Present – ‘Tommy 30’

NME say:

“It feels like I am kind of acting as that character… It is almost like singing a diary,” The Wedding Present’s David Gedge said in an interview last year of his band’s 30th anniversary tour for ‘Tommy’, their much-loved early singles collection. “It was 30 years ago. I have changed and moved on in life just like everyone else.” But in playing the songs live again after three decades, Gedge noticed his relationship with the songs had changed too, so decided to re-record the album in full, with this new versions being described as “bigger, warmer and gentler” than before.

Norman Records say:

30 years on from its original release, The Wedding Present have re-recorded ‘Tommy’. At the time it was something of the less loved younger sibling to their their debut proper, being that it collected a selection of their early singles. The new recording shows how the band have grown and evolved, and deliberately conceives of them as belonging to one release.

Crumb – ‘Crumb EP / Locket EP’

NME say:

We recently described how Brooklyn band Crumb combine “woozy synths, fragmented guitar lines and unusual sax solos to make something that flits between hypnotic indie jams and claustrophobic alt-rock with trip-hop tinges,” adding that their music “sounds like New York in that limbo period between the streets being populated with people heading home from bars, and the same people making their way to work in the morning.” With their debut album ‘Jinx’ released just this past June, it’s a perfect time to revisit their two early EPs.

Norman Records say:

Hot off the back of the release of their debut full-length album Jinx earlier this year, New York-based quartet Crumb make their previous EP releases available on a single vinyl package. Containing 2016’s self-titled EP and the following year’s ‘Locket’ EP, it shows their evolution from college project to full-time touring concern.

Dinosaur Jr. – ‘Where You Been’ (Deluxe Expanded Edition)

NME say:

With a career spanning 35 years, Dinosaur Jr. have earned the odd nostalgic look-back every once in a while; and now they’re set to reissue all four of their 90s albums via Cherry Red Records in September. ‘Where You Been’, their fifth LP released in 1993, will come equipped with bonus B-sides, live recordings plus new in-depth sleeve notes.

Norman Records say:

‘Where You Been’ was the fifth album by Dinosaur Jr. It is regarded as one of their best and by many as one of the best albums of the 1990s. It was originally released in February 1993. Upon its release, Melody Maker raised the question, “Do we have the album of the year already?” It contains one of the band’s greatest songs in ‘Start Choppin’’. The Country-grunge crossover, ‘Get Me’ was also released as a single. Essential stuff.

Zero 7 – ‘When It Falls’

NME say:

Electronic duo Zero 7 are celebrating 15 years of their landmark album ‘When It Falls’, which featured vocals from a pre-megastardom Sia, with a double vinyl reissue. It features rare tracks, alternative mixes, plus remixes from the likes of Danger Mouse, Stereolab and more.

Norman Records say:

‘When It Falls ‘is the second album by production duo Zero 7. It was originally released in 2004, so here we have a 15th anniversary edition, I guess. Its available on a 2CD version that includes a disc of remixes by artists such as Stereolab and Danger Mouse. Features vocals from Sia, Mozez, Sophie Barker and Tina Dico.

Not Waving & Dark Mark (Mark Lanegan) – ‘Downwelling’

NME say:

Electronic producer Alessio Natalizia, AKA Not Waving (previously known as Banjo Or Freakout), has teamed up with alt-rock legend Mark Lanegan (going by his rhyme-tastic moniker of Dark Mark) for a surprisingly natural-sounding collaboration that combines Natalizia’s subtle ambience with Lanegan’s unmistakable bourbon-y tones.

Norman Records say:

Not Waving have been collaborating with all sorts of late including Jim O’Rourke and Colin Potter but this team up with Dark Mark (aka Mark Lanegan) could be the most intriguing. It marries the bands layers of rolling, dreamy electronics with the whisky-stained burr of Lanegan. The results could be compared to the later out-there work of Scott Walker or David Sylvian.

Ned’s Atomic Dustbin – ‘God Fodder’

NME say:

Before Britpop, there was grebo, a short-lived scene emerging from the Midlands that combined rave and psych elements with punk and metal influences. It brought us Pop Will Eat Itself, The Wonder Stuff and fellow Stourbridge band, Ned’s Atomic Dustbin. The latter’s debut album ‘God Fodder’ was our 23rd favourite album of 1991, just behind Julian Cope and above the likes of Morrissey, Blur, Hole and A Tribe Called Quest. The record has now been reissued on limited-edition silver and black marbled vinyl.

Norman Records say:

History traditionally hasn’t been kind to Ned’s Atomic Dustbin, often held up as everything wrong with British music in the early 90s before Suede ignited Britpop. But their 1991 debut album ‘God Fodder’ still retains a certain time-specific charm, all noisy guitars and rattling drums, and this special vinyl re-issue is long overdue.





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